Technical Program / Abstracts

Listed below by session

Aboriginal Engagement Session

Opening Session

Development Highlights

Mining Sector Issues

Mineral Exploration and Geoscience Highlights I: Flin Flon-Lynn Lake area

Mineral Exploration and Geoscience Highlights II: Northern Superior Province

Mineral Exploration and Geoscience Highlights III: Phanerozoic Strata

Mineral Exploration and Geoscience Highlights IV: Northwestern Manitoba and the Thompson Nickel Belt

Short Course: Geology and Mineral Potential of Manitoba’s Premier Mineral Belts: Thompson Nickel Belt

Other 2015 links

d2015 Speakers

 

Aboriginal Engagement Session

The Land is the Heart of Its People
Chief Jim Tobacco (First Nation Mining Economic Development Inc.)

No abstract available

No video available

 

Vision and Mission of the First Nation Mining Economic Development Inc.
Chief Michael Constant (First Nation Mining Economic Development Inc.)

No abstract available

No video available

 

Objectives and Outcomes
Glenn Sanderson (First Nation Mining Economic Development Inc.)

No abstract available

No video available

 

Understanding Mineral Resources’ Permitting Process
Linda Murphy (Manitoba Mineral Resources)

This presentation from Mineral Resources aims to provide a clear understanding of the required permits and timeframes that can be expected within the mining cycle.  

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The Mineral Industry and Aboriginal Communities in Canada: Identifying Challenges to Uncover Opportunities
Lesley Williams (Prospectors and Developers Association of Canada (PDAC))

The minerals industry and Aboriginal communities continue to explore ways to develop positive relationships that translate into mutually beneficial outcomes - successful projects and long-term community socio-economic development. There are a range of factors that contribute to maximizing the potential to realize these mutual benefits, as well as a number of challenges that can create barriers to success. This presentation will outline the results of the PDAC’s outreach initiative that aimed to identify the challenges and opportunities in relation to relationships between mineral companies and Aboriginal communities and Aboriginal participation in the mineral industry. It will also examine some of the overarching issues related to the Duty to Consult across Canada, which was identified through the PDAC’s outreach as the top challenge impacting company-community relationships.  

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Towards Sustainable Mining: Driving Better Environmental and Social Performance with Site-Level Assurance and Public Reporting
Tara Shea (Mining Association of Canada (MAC))

This presentation will introduce the Mining Association of Canada’s (MAC) award-winning Towards Sustainable Mining (TSM) initiative. The presentation will summarize the business case for TSM, the program architecture and describe how the different components of the program are applied at mining facilities across Canada and abroad.  TSM is the only mining specific standard that includes facility level annual public reporting and independent verification. The presentation closes with a review of the results from the soon to be released 2015 TSM Progress Report, demonstrating the measurable progress made by the industry since verified reporting began in 2006, and a summary of some of MAC’s other priorities such as transparency of payments to governments from Canadian mining companies. The TSM initiative is MAC’s commitment to responsible mining and participation in the program is mandatory for our members. It is a set of tools and indicators to drive performance and ensure that our members are doing the right things for the right reasons at each of their facilities. Adhering to the guiding principles of TSM, mining companies demonstrate leadership by: engaging with communities; driving world-leading environmental practices; and committing to the safety and health of employees and surrounding communities. Today, communities expect more of mining companies and the industry expects much more of itself. TSM helps mining companies meet society’s needs for minerals, metals and energy products in the most socially, economically and environmentally responsible way.   At its core, TSM is: Accountable: Assessments are conducted at the facility level where mining activity takes place – the only program in the world to do this in our sector; Transparent: Members publicly report their performance against 23 indicators annually in MAC’s TSM Progress Reports and results are externally verified every 3 years; and Credible: TSM is overseen by an independent Community of Interest (COI) Advisory Panel, which shapes the program for continual advancement.  

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EXPORT Skills Inventory and Vendor Registrations Database:  Linking Industry and Community
Sheldon Wuttunee (Saskatchewan First Nations Natural Resources Centre of Excellence Inc.)

The EXPORT Database is an innovative robust database management system.  Designed by the Centre of Excellence in partnership with BHP Billiton, Enbridge Pipelines, and Aboriginal Affairs & Northern Development Canada, EXPORT has the capacity to create intelligence concerning the First Nations workforce and the First Nations Private sector and match them with opportunities for employment and supply chain development.  EXPORT is a skills inventory and business registration database intelligence and management system.  A number of program’s components for individuals, businesses and communities will be discussed during this session.  

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Opening Session


Welcome
John Fox, Assistant Deputy Minister, Manitoba Mineral Resources
Nelson Scribe
Honourable MaryAnn Mihychuk

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Welcoming Remarks
Minister Dave Chomiak, Manitoba Mineral Resources

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Creating a Future for Our People
Chief Michael Constant (Minister's Mining Advisory Council)

No abstract available

No video available

 

Manitoba Mineral Exploration and Development Highlights 2015
Chris Beaumont-Smith (Manitoba Minerals Policy and Business Development)

The challenge of low commodity prices and difficult capital markets have presented exploration and mining companies with difficult decisions as they navigate the current economic reality. Many have revised exploration and development decisions affecting the mineral exploration and mining projects, while others continue to invest and many exploration and development projects continue to advance. The presentation will highlight exploration trends, provide an overview of current exploration projects, and update the status of advanced exploration and development projects in Manitoba.

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Overview of 2015 Activities of the Manitoba Geological Survey
Christian Böhm (Manitoba Geological Survey)

Public geoscience provided by governments is widely recognized as one of the key determinants of a favourable investment climate for mineral exploration. In addition, government geoscience has become increasingly relevant for the public through such aspects as infrastructure development, education, environment, health and safety, and natural hazard prevention. Benefits from public geoscience on the resource development side, which typically accrue in the medium to long-term, can be adversely affected by global commodity cycles and related low natural resource prices - as has been the case since 2008. Additional factors that continue to negatively affect mineral exploration and development in Manitoba and elsewhere in Canada are uncertainties concerning environmental regulations, protected areas, disputed land claims and socio-economic agreements/community development conditions – areas that are being addressed by Manitoba Mineral Resources. Mining is the primary driver of northern Manitoba’s economy and, along with hydroelectric developments, represents the most viable options for sustainable economic development in the future. In order to meet the challenge of the next upswing in the global economy, the Manitoba Geological Survey is continuing to invest in knowledge infrastructure for the future of Manitoba’s resource industries. Of particular importance in 2015 was the hiring of four new field geologists, representing an instrumental step toward maintaining a modern survey that combines strengths in traditional fields with new expertise and vision. In 2014, Manitoba returned to the top 10 of ranked mining jurisdictions worldwide, in part due to its excellent mineral potential and geological database. The presentation is aimed to demonstrate the broad range of partnered and collaborative geoscience projects conducted by the Manitoba Geological Survey in 2015, designed to enhance and update the geoscience knowledge base of the province and to promote resource development, wise land management, Aboriginal engagement and mineral education to the public.

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Development Highlights

Monument Bay Project Update: Development Highlights
Glen Kuntz (Yamana Gold Inc.)

On June 22, 2015 Yamana Gold Inc. (Yamana) acquired all of the outstanding shares of Mega Precious Metals Inc., subsidiaries and projects. Since the acquisition Yamana has continued exploring and defining Canada’s Emerging Gold-Tungsten Camp in NE, Manitoba at the Monument Bay Project.  The ongoing exploration activities continue to build upon the October 2014 43-101 update of the resources for the Twin Lakes Deposit by Mega Precious Metals, which demonstrated 2.1 M Measured and Indicated Ounces at 1.52 g/t gold and 248,000 mtu WO3 and Inferred Resources of 0.5 M Ounces  at 1.58 g/t gold and 95,000 mtu WO3.  The 338 km2 project consists of multiple mineralized deposits along with multiple gold/tungsten bearing structures and new targets for both bulk tonnage and high grade gold/tungsten deposits.  All deposits are open for expansion along strike and at depth. Yamana’s health, safety, environment and community relations programs are integrated into all our operations.  These programs support Yamana’s goals of achieving zero injuries, and no significant environmental and social impacts. Our community relations efforts are guided by four pillars: local development, quality of life, education, and culture.   We believe investing in these areas is the best way for us to contribute to building self-sustaining communities that will continue to prosper after our operations end.  Since January 2011, the Monument Bay Project has focused on these four pillars and we believe that our transparent, collaborative and hands on approach towards engagement and consultation have enabled us to ensure that traditional activities and areas of cultural significance are protected and respected. Yamana’s environmental policies reflect three areas of focus: minimizing our impact, reducing our consumption of non-renewable energy, and making all of our operations more energy efficient. At the Monument Bay Project we have continually improved our environmental footprint through key environmental monitoring programs such as initial heritage studies, aquatic and terrestrial testing, stream flow monitoring, water quality and waste management programs along with ongoing land use studies, bulk fuel handling programs and the installation of pellet stoves and a boiler both help us reduce our carbon footprint and regenerate local forests. For the remainder of 2015 Yamana will continue to focus on advancing and de-risking the Monument Bay Project with a fall drill program, Old Core Assay Program (OCAP), ongoing engineering related studies and continued environmental monitoring programs.   

No video available

 

Outline of the Progress at the MacLellan and Farley Lake Resources in the Lynn Lake Gold Camp
Mark Rein (Alamos Gold Inc.)

In late 2014 AuRico Gold entered into an agreement with Carlisle Goldfields to acquire a 19.9% interest in Carlisle Goldfields with the option to earn up to 60% of the Lynn Lake Project by committing to spending $20 million dollars and completing a feasibility study within 3 years.  In early 2015, AuRico Gold and Alamos Gold entered into a merger agreement to become Alamos Gold.  At this time Alamos Gold has put forth an offer to acquire 100% interest in Carlisle Goldfields with a total consideration 28.5 million dollars. The main target for the Alamos work program this year was the past-producing MacLellan and Farley Lake Gold occurrences.  Both Farley Lake and MacLellan are shallow occurrences that are conducive to open pit mining. The Geological settings for the two occurrences are different and will be outlined during the presentation.  During 2015, Alamos is in the process of completing a drilling program, a geotechnical investigation, and an environmental baseline study with the intent to complete a feasibility study for the entire property.  Through partnerships with the Marcel Colomb First Nations, over 30,000 meters of infill, geotechnical, and metallurgical drilling was completed in the last year along with a geotechnical investigation by Golder & Associates, and an environmental baseline study is underway by Stantec consulting.  Exploration efforts consisting of drilling and geophysics are currently underway on other portions of the property.  Overall, the Lynn Lake Project is a low-risk growth opportunity as a high grade, open pit project located in one of the top mining jurisdictions in the world.

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Our Region, Our Business, Our Future
Mark Scott (Vale)

No abstract available

No video available

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Mining Sector Issues

Surface Access Requirements on Crown Land
Jaime Patrick (Manitoba Conservation and Water Stewardship)

An update on Conservation and Water Stewardship’s ongoing collaboration with Manitoba Mineral Resources and industry in developing an expedited process that will enable access to resources while ensuring sensitive sites are protected and environmental needs addressed. The importance of Conservation and Water Stewardship and industry taking a proactive approach to conditions identified to mitigate impacts to the environment  to ensure Crown land work permits are issued in a timely manner.

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Uncertain Times - An Update on the State of the Junior ‎Mining Sector in Canada
Rod Thomas (Prospectors and Developers Association of Canada (PDAC))

No abstract available

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An Update on the State of the Exploration and Mining Industry in Manitoba
Tim Friesen (Mining Association of Manitoba (MAC))

No abstract available

No video available

 

2015 Legal Round-up: Hot Topics in Mining
Sacha Paul and John Stefaniuk (Thompson Dorfman Sweatman LLP)

Hear the latest on this year’s legal developments in the energy, mining and natural resource industries. Whether it is new legislation, a big law suit, a land claim, a response to a blockade, find out what is shaping the legal landscape (with a Manitoba flavour). Learn from and ask questions of leading Manitoba lawyers with decades of experience in aboriginal, mining, litigation, business and environmental law.

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Mineral Exploration and Geoscience Highlights I: Flin Flon-Lynn Lake area

The Carlisle-Alamos Joint Venture at Lynn Lake: A Project for the Times
Abraham Drost (Carlisle Goldfields)

Strong economics in the recent preliminary economic assessment positioned Carlisle Goldfields and its Joint Venture partner Alamos Gold Inc. to conduct a feasibility study on re-starting gold production at Lynn Lake, Manitoba. The potential exists to build a ‘best-in-class’ mining operation on sustainable development of the high grade, open-pittable Farley Lake and MacLellan gold deposits in the past-producing Lynn Lake Gold Camp. Carlisle recommends that its shareholders tender to the recent Alamos bid for all remaining shares of Carlisle not already owned.  Carlisle fully expects that on successful closing of the bid process, Alamos will continue with its highly credible technical approach to developing a robust mineral reserve which supports a construction decision.

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Callinex Mines Advancing New VMS Discovery
Max Porterfield (Callinex Mines Inc.)

Callinex recently interested a new VMS zone over 7.4m that assayed 1.58% Cu Eq. adjacent to its Sourdough deposit within its 100% owned Pine Bay Project located near Flin Flon, Manitoba. This new zone is open in all directions and is not located nearby any historic drilling. This new zone was a ‘blind’ discovery due to its depth and is highly prospective for further exploration. Furthermore, borehole geophysical surveys completed by Koop Geotechnical identified an inhole anomaly that correlates with the VMS zone and it is modeled to have significant strike and depth extent. The Company plans to complete between 5,000 to 10,000 meters in 2016 to follow-up on this discovery, along with several currently identified targets at Pine Bay.

No video available

 

Explore to Producer
Neil Richardson (VMS Ventures Inc.)

VMS Ventures Inc. (VMS) has been exploring in Manitoba for over a decade now.  In 2007 the company made a discovery “Reed Mine” that would change the company from being an exploration company to a producer.  Prior to the discovery the company acquired a large package in the Snow Lake area, and flew a Versatile Time-Domain Electromagnetic (VTEM) survey.  This survey along with MMI soil geochemistry, geological mapping and compilation of historical assessment and government data provide the foundation of target selection.  The company continues to work in partnership with Hudbay Minerals Inc. (HBM) at the Reed mine where the company has a 30% interest in the operation.  Currently the mine is around the 280 metre level and mining is focusing on zone 20 and zone 10.  Exploration around the mine is being carried out by VMS and HBM in an attempt to augment resources near the mine.

No video available

 

Geological Investigations in the Reed Lake Area: Observations from Exploration Drill Core and Implications of New Whole-rock Chemistry Data
Simon Gagné (Manitoba Geological Survey)

This presentation will provide an update on geoscientific investigations of the Reed Lake area. Following up on bedrock mapping conducted in 2013 and 2014, six weeks were spent examining drill core and visiting shoreline outcrops on Reed Lake in June-July 2015. This was the third field season of a multi-year project focusing on the Reed Lake region. The Reed Lake area represents a critical bridge between two main segments of the Flin Flon belt, as it lies at the boundary between the Amisk collage to the west and the Snow Lake segment to the east. The Reed Lake area also includes the Fourmile Island assemblage, a bimodal succession of arc- to arc-rift affinity volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks that hosts several significant VMS deposits, including the currently producing Reed Lake Cu-Zn deposit. The main focus of the 2015 fieldwork was to examine recent and historical drill core of Paleoproterozoic bedrock from the southern portion of Reed Lake and the sub-Phanerozoic area immediately to the south. A total of 44 drill cores were examined, documented and sampled to complement a set of 9 drill cores that were examined in 2013-2014.  The objectives of the drill core examination program are to: (i) better document the stratigraphy of Paleoproterozoic supracrustal rocks in the Reed Lake area; (ii) investigate the geological setting of volcanogenic massive sulphide deposits hosted by these rocks; and (iii) characterize the nature and intensity of associated hydrothermal alteration, which can serve as an important exploration tool. This contribution will discuss the distribution of the various depositional facies of volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks observed at Reed Lake and in drill core. Variations in intensity and style of alteration of the supracrustal rocks at Reed Lake were documented during drill core examination and characterized through semi-quantitative PXRF analysis and high precision whole-rock geochemistry. The significance of newly acquired trace elements data for bimodal rocks of Reed Lake and its sub-Phanerozoic basement will also be discussed.

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Mineral Exploration and Geoscience Highlights II: Northern Superior Province

Monument Bay Project Update: Exploration and Geoscience
Tim Twomey (Yamana Gold Inc.)

No abstract available

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Geology and Economic Potential of the Oxford Lake–Knee Lake Greenstone Belt, Superior Province, Manitoba: New Results of Bedrock Mapping at Knee Lake
Scott Anderson (Manitoba Geological Survey)

As the largest greenstone belt in the northwestern Superior province, the Oxford Lake–Knee Lake belt is central to understanding the stratigraphy, tectonic evolution and economic potential of a large and geologically diverse region that includes some of the most prospective yet under-explored greenstone belts in the Archean Superior craton. In 2012, the MGS initiated a project to remap the belt, beginning at Oxford Lake and extending to the south basin of Knee Lake in 2015. Coupled with results of MGS mapping at Knee Lake in 1997–1998, new mapping indicates that supracrustal rocks previously assigned to the Hayes River and Oxford Lake ‘groups’ constitute several different tectonostratigraphic assemblages; U-Pb zircon ages indicate at least four major stages of volcanism and sedimentation (ca. 2890, 2830, 2720 and <2705 Ma). This talk will present salient results of fieldwork at Knee Lake in 2015, which include: 1) definition of three volcanic facies associations in the Oxford Lake group based on bulk composition (ultramafic, basaltic andesite and andesitic–dacitic) and geochemical affinity (lamprophyric, shoshonitic and calcalkalic, respectively); 2) revised structural framework and deformation history for the supracrustal rocks, including identification of at least three generations of ductile deformation structure; 3) improved stratigraphic and structural context for mineral occurrences, including specific favourable areas for volcanogenic Cu-Zn-Ag-Au, magmatic Ni-Cu-PGE, alkaline-intrusion–related rare metals, and orogenic Au deposits.

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Synorogenic Gold Mineralization in Granite-Greenstone Terranes: The Deep Connection between Extension, Major Faults, Synorogenic Clastic Basins, Magmatism, Thrust Inversion, and Long-Term Preservation
Wouter Bleeker (Geological Survey of Canada)

In this talk I will explain what is special about the major the faults (“the breaks”) that characterize granite-greenstone terranes such as the Abitibi in Ontario and Quebec, i.e. the empirical association of major steep faults, preserved panels of synorogenic clastic rocks and alkaline volcanics, synorogenic magmatism, and world-class gold endowment. All of this can be explained by a model in which the principal faults were initiated as synorogenic extensional faults, playing a critical role in basin formation, before being inverted as thick-skinned thrusts that buried (and preserved!) upper crustal depositional environments with gold deposits in their structural footwall. Extension played a critical role in the flare-up of synorogenic magmatism, and it is the extent of this magmatism that may be the ultimate predictor of overall gold endowment. This new model for large Archean gold deposits brings the understanding of these deposits closer to how we think many modern gold deposits form.

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Mineral Exploration and Geoscience Highlights III: Phanerozoic Strata

Current Quaternary Geology Projects
Tyler Hodder (Manitoba Geological Survey)

This talk will summarize current Quaternary field work being undertaken by the Manitoba Geology Survey in southwest and northeast Manitoba. Southwest Manitoba studies are investigating the surficial geology of the Arden map area (NTS 62J6). Field work conducted in the summer of 2015 visited sites to log the near surface sediments and Quaternary sections. Till samples were collected as part of this mapping program for geochemical and clast-lithology analyses. In addition, 20 samples were collected to be analyzed for Kimberlite Indicator Minerals as a follow up to surveys conducted in the 1990s. On-going work in the northeast Manitoba is focused on mapping the surficial geology and investigating the Quaternary stratigraphy of thick drift succession within the Hudson Bay Lowland region of Manitoba. Field work conducted in 2015 visited surficial mapping sites and logged new sections along the Nelson River.

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Preliminary Evaluation of Gypsum Deposits in Harcus, Southwestern Manitoba
Kathryn Lapenskie (Manitoba Geological Survey)

Gypsum is an important industrial mineral that has been produced in Manitoba for over 115 years. The last major report produced on gypsum deposits was produced in 1959 by the Manitoba Geological Survey. In order to provide a comprehensive update to this report, a new gypsum project was initiated in the spring of 2015. Currently, gypsum from the Jurassic Upper Amaranth Member is quarried near Harcus in southwestern Manitoba, and therefore this area was selected for further study as the first stage of this project. A preliminary stratigraphic section was completed over the summer, and six drillcores were logged. Drillcore data from Manitoba Mineral Resources assessment files was used to create preliminary isopachs maps of the thickness of the Upper Amaranth Member and of the thickness of the Quaternary sediments overlying the member. The isopachs maps demonstrate a high degree of variability in the thickness of the Quaternary sediments and gypsum around the area where quarrying is occurring. Future work will include additional stratigraphic sections in the active quarries, finalizing isopachs and structure maps, and extending the scope of this project to include the Silver Plains and Gypsumville areas.

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Potash Deposits in the Devonian Prairie Evaporite, Southwestern Manitoba
Michelle Nicolas (Manitoba Geological Survey)

Potash deposits occur within the Devonian Prairie Evaporite in southwestern Manitoba. The Esterhazy and White Bear members are the potash beds that extend eastward into Manitoba from Saskatchewan. The known area of potash occurrence in Manitoba can be subdivided into three subareas: 1) the Russell-McAuley area, 2) the Daly-Sinclair area, and 3) the Pierson area. These are separated from the others by broad areas with no potash occurrence. The only area that has been actively explored for potash is the Russell-McAuley area, where the Esterhazy Member is of sufficient thickness and grade to sustain potentially economic underground potash mining. The Daly-Sinclair and Pierson areas have not been explored due to the development of petroleum resources, which precludes the co-development of potash resources. Accordingly, there are no resource estimates for these areas. Resource estimates for the Russell-McAuley area can be subdivided into northern (Russell deposit) and southern (St. Lazare deposit) blocks, reflecting the pattern of historical potash dispositions. The Russell deposit has a resource estimate of 392 million tonnes with an average grade of 22.5% K2O and a mining thickness of 2.74 m. The historical resource estimate for the St. Lazare deposit is 650 million tonnes with an average grade of 20.9% K2O, a 16% cut-off grade and a mining thickness of 2.44 m. During the last three decades, changes to provincial mining and mineral statutes have resulted in the release of new information in assessment files that enables a detailed look at the structure of, and anomalies within, the Prairie Evaporite in the Russell-McAuley area. These anomalies include several Winnipegosis mound complexes throughout the area, occasional collapse structures and basement faults.

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Mineral Exploration and Geoscience Highlights IV: Northwestern Manitoba and the Thompson Nickel Belt

Tectonic Evolution and Metallogeny of the Paleoproterozoic Trans-Hudson Orogen
David Corrigan (Geological Survey of Canada)

The Trans-Hudson orogen records approximately 150 m.y. of ocean opening followed by ca. 90 m.y. of ocean closure, arc formation, tectonic and magmatic accretion, followed by 30 to 40 m.y. of continent-continent collision during the formation of the Supercontinent Nuna (Columbia). Early events related to plate convergence include outward growth of a pre-existing continental collage consisting of the Archean-age Slave and Rae cratons by successive accretion of Archean ribbon- and micro-continents (Hearne, Meta-Incognita, Sugluk and Sask cratons). Oceanic arc terranes that formed within and outboard of this collage (in the orogen internides) record a complex history of intraoceanic accretion, back-arc opening and inversion, tectonic accretion to continental margins, subduction flip, development of continental arc batholiths and obduction of oceanic crust. Observed collisional processes include development of pro-shear and retro-shear wedges, vergence inversion, vertical-axis rotation and crustal block extrusion. The preservation of protoliths from all stages of tectonic evolution, from rift to drift to accretion and collision, and the complex and quite varied metamorphic and structural evolution, led to the formation and preservation of numerous and quite varied deposit types in Manitoba. It also allows us to speculate on the potential for yet-to-be discovered deposits. 

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Preliminary Results of Bedrock Mapping in the Keewatin River Area, the Lynn Lake Greenstone Belt, Northwestern Manitoba
Eric Yang (Manitoba Geological Survey)

This talk presents preliminary results of bedrock mapping conducted in the 2015 summer in the Keewatin River area, the Lynn Lake greenstone belt, northwestern Manitoba. The Keewatin River area, where the MacLellan Au-Ag and Lynn Lake Ni-Cu-Co deposits occur, contains a variety of volcanic rocks comprising basalt, andesite, dacite and rhyolite and related volcaniclastic rocks, along with sedimentary rock units. The volcanic sequence is overlain by reworked volcaniclastic and epiclastic rocks, suggesting deposition in a setting comparable to modern volcanic arcs or back-arc basins. These rocks were cross-cut by several intrusive suites. The mapping results suggest that: 1) picrite (and synvolcanic pyroxenite) of unit 3 may have served as a chemical trap and locus for high strain zones, favourable for Au mineralization; 2) middle amphibolite facies metamorphism is recorded by mineral assemblages observed in some of the unit 4 metasedimentary rocks; 3) Au mineralization controlled by shear zones at the MacLellan mine is likely to postdate magmatic Ni-Cu-Co mineralization at the Lynn Lake mine associated with the unit 5 metagabbro intrusion; and 4) quartz-feldspar porphyries (unit 9) locally contain magnetite phenocrysts, indicating that they may have been deriving from relatively oxidized intrusions. Hydrothermal fluids associated with such oxidized intrusions may have played an imperative part in Au mineralization.

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Nickel Mining and Exploration on the Thompson Nickel Belt
Kevin Zhu (CaNickel Mining Limited)

CaNickel Mining Limited (Formerly "Crowflight Minerals Inc.") (TSX: CML, Frankfurt: CMIC) is a Canadian junior mining company that owns the Bucko Lake Nickel Mine near Wabowden, Manitoba. In addition to the operation at the Bucko Lake Nickel Mine, CaNickel owns or has under option an additional 800 square kilometers of advanced-stage base metal exploration properties in the Thompson Nickel Belt in Manitoba.

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Integrated Bedrock and Surficial Mapping at Southern Indian Lake: Pegmatite-hosted Gold and Implications for Exploration
Tania Martins (Manitoba Geological Survey)

During this talk the bedrock geology at Southern Indian Lake will be described, with particular emphasis on the new work developed this summer. The Southern Indian area is underlain by Paleoproterozoic rocks of the Trans-Hudson orogen, including metamorphosed plutonic, sedimentary and volcanic rocks of the Southern Indian domain and metaplutonic rocks of the Chipewyan domain. Previous studies at Southern Indian Lake have identified exposures of late Archean to early Paleoproterozoic crust, which may have been the source of detrital and xenocrystic zircons of the same age in some of the younger Paleoproterozoic rocks in the Southern Indian domain. These findings could have implications for diamond exploration in this part of northern Manitoba. Results of previous work and this study also indicate potential for a variety of other deposit types including volcanogenic base metal and intrusion-related gold deposits.This talk will also briefly touch on the Quaternary geology of this area. Till geochemistry is commonly used in drift-covered regions to help determine the source area for dispersal trains, but becomes more complex to interpret in palimpsest terrains such as at Southern Indian Lake. Understanding the complex erosional and depositional history of paleo-ice–flow phases integrated with the knowledge of bedrock geology will provide mineral exploration companies with an up-to-date exploration framework.

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Short Course: Geology and Mineral Potential of Manitoba’s Premier Mineral Belts: Thompson Nickel Belt

Welcoming Remarks
Scott Anderson (Manitoba Geological Survey)

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Tectonic Setting and Evolution of the Circum-Superior Belt, Trans-Hudson Orogen
David Corrigan (Geological Survey of Canada)

The Trans-Hudson orogen records approximately 150 m.y. of ocean opening followed by ca. 90 m.y. of ocean closure, arc formation, tectonic and magmatic accretion, followed by 30 to 40 m.y. of continent-continent collision during the formation of the Supercontinent Nuna (Columbia). Early events related to plate convergence include outward growth of a pre-existing continental collage consisting of the Archean-age Slave and Rae cratons by successive accretion of Archean ribbon- and micro-continents (Hearne, Meta-Incognita, Sugluk and Sask cratons). Oceanic arc terranes that formed within and outboard of this collage (in the orogen internides) record a complex history of intraoceanic accretion, back-arc opening and inversion, tectonic accretion to continental margins, subduction flip, development of continental arc batholiths and obduction of oceanic crust. This short course segment will focus on the accretionary and collisional history along the Circum-Superior margin and implication for the formation and preservation of magmatic Ni-Cu-PGE and other deposit types, from the Thompson Nickel Belt to the Labrador Trough.

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Stratigraphy of the Thompson Nickel Belt, Manitoba, and Implications for Nickel Exploration
Chris Couëslan (Manitoba Geological Survey)

Nickel deposits in the Thompson Nickel Belt are restricted to the ca. 2.1–1.88 Ga Ospwagan Group, which lies unconformably on the Archean basement rocks. The nickel is associated with ca. 1.88 Ga ultramafic bodies that occur within specific sulphide-rich horizons of the Ospwagan Group. Other Paleoproterozoic sedimentary successions within the belt include the ca. 1.85–1.83 Ga Burntwood and Grass River groups which are not considered to be prospective for nickel. Intense deformation has resulted in the local shearing and infolding of rocks belonging to the younger sequences with Ospwagan Group rocks. Differentiating these rocks is further complicated by a relatively high-grade metamorphic overprint. The detrital source for the Ospwagan Group in interpreted to be the Superior craton towards the southeast, while the source for the Burntwood and Grass River groups is interpreted to be the juvenile, arc-related rocks of the Trans-Hudson Orogen to the west. The disparate sources of the detritus allow for the use of trace-element and Sm-Nd isotope bulk-rock geochemistry to discriminate the more economically prospective Ospwagan Group from barren Burntwood and Grass River groups.

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Relative Contribution of Magmatic and Post-Magmatic Processes in the Genesis of the Thompson Mine Ni-Co Sulfide Ores, Manitoba, Canada
Peter Lightfoot (Vale)

The Ni-Co-(PGE) sulfide deposits of the Thompson Nickel Belt (TNB) in Northern Manitoba, Canada are part of the fifth largest nickel camp in the world based on contained nickel; past production from the TNB deposits is 2,500kt Ni. The Thompson Deposit is located on the eastern and southern flanks of the Thompson Dome structure, which is a re-folded nappe structure formed during collision of the Trans-Hudson Orogen with the Canadian Shield.   The majority of Thompson Mine sulfides are hosted in a sulfidic schist and comprise both barren sulfide (<200 ppm Ni) and a Ni-enriched sulfide with 1-18 wt% Ni in 100% sulfide. The sulfide ores comprise discrete populations with maximum Ni tenors of ~8, 11 and 13 wt% Ni in 100% sulfide, which relate the structure of the host rocks. The primary origin of the mineralization is undoubtedly magmatic, but the main controls on grade and tenor of the sulfide ore deposits relate to the separation of the ductile monosulfide solid solution from granular pentlandite during high grade metamorphism.

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Tectonometamorphic Evolution of the Thompson Nickel Belt, Manitoba
Chris Couëslan (Manitoba Geological Survey)

The Thompson Nickel Belt (TNB) forms the southwestern external zone of the Trans-Hudson Orogen (THO). It represents the northwest margin of the Archean Superior craton which was overlain by the Paleoproterozoic Ospwagan Group and intruded by the ~1880 Ma Molson dikes and Thompson ultramafic sills with their associated world-class nickel deposits. The western edge of the TNB was also intruded by 1890–1870 Ma granites. This was tectonically reworked during the ca. 1.9–1.7 Ga Trans-Hudson orogeny by four main phases of deformation. D1 is poorly constrained with F1 folds only recognized at Pipe mine where they are crosscut by Molson dikes. Early, ca. 1830 Ma, D2 thrusting of Kisseynew Domain rocks (part of THO internal zone) was followed by further granitoid intrusion and ca. 1820–1800 Ma recumbent F2 folding and the development of a regional S2 foliation. D3 (ca. 1790–1770 Ma) resulted in the dominant, upright, northeast-trending isoclinal folds with vertical to steeply southeast dipping axial planes resulting in the present architecture of elongate basement domes with steep lineations. Intervening sinuous keels of the Ospwagan Group sediments and mafic–ultramafic rocks are remnants of the small D2 synclinal fold nappes. D3 was accompanied by peak metamorphic conditions and tightening of the regional foliation along the F3 fold limbs. Sinistral transpression during advancing D3 and later (< ca. 1760 Ma) D4 resulted in mylonitic shearing along the F3 fold limbs. The TNB is characterized by an elongate, nested metamorphic zonal pattern, which parallels the overall trend of the belt and regional D3 structures. A central zone characterized by middle amphibolite-facies mineral assemblages is flanked to the northwest and southeast by zones of upper amphibolite-facies assemblages, which are, in turn, flanked by zones of granulite-facies mineral assemblages. Along the eastern margin of the TNB, east of the granulite-facies zone, is a return to middle amphibolite-facies assemblages. The metamorphic-facies zonation is a product of differential uplift along D3-D4 structures. A model history involves a passive margin (Ospwagan Group on Archean basement), possible early continental-arc magmatism and collisional D1 deformation, renewed extension with Molson dike and ultramafic intrusions triggering nickel mineralization, terminal D2 collision with the THO internal zone, and D3–D4 intracontinental transpression by far-field forces.

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Magma Chamber Geometry and the Localization of Ni-Cu-(PGE) Sulfide Mineralization: Global Examples and Exploration Implications
Peter Lightfoot (Vale)

The distribution of magmatic Ni-Cu-platinum group element (PGE) sulfide deposits and mineralization in mafic intrusions is controlled by the geometry and structural setting of the magma chamber. The recognition that the Ovoid Deposit and the Eastern Deeps Deposit at Voisey’s Bay are localized where a dyke-like conduit connects to a larger intrusive body has been a key observation that has underpinned much of the exploration activity. Likewise the geological relationships in the Noril’sk Type intrusions indicate a localization of mineralization within the thicker axial parts of magma conduits that follow and are modified by major structures like the Noril’sk Kharaelakh Fault. These structural relationships are repeated at Jinchuan in Gansu Province; where the configuration of the intrusion is controlled by regional structures that create space for the emplacement of a small intrusion. All of these examples share common features including the space created within and adjacent to fault zones by the local structures that link into mantle-penetrating fractures that localize magmatism in the roots of large igneous provinces. These primary controls likely provided the setting in which many of the Thompson ultramafic chonoliths were formed.

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