Geoscience

Industrial Minerals

Deposits & Occurrences 2006 - Phanerozoic

Kaolin and Clays


NTS Map

Click images below to enlarge:

Click to enlarge image of Bricks made from Manitoba clay

Bricks made from Manitoba clay

Click to enlarge image of Odanah clay quarry near Miami, MB

Odanah clay quarry near Miami, MB

Click to enlarge image of Swan River, St. Rose du Lac Quarry

Swan River, St. Rose du Lac Quarry

Click to enlarge image of Arborg kaolin occurrence

Arborg kaolin occurrence

Click to enlarge image of Manitoba Escarpment

Manitoba Escarpment

 

Brick and Lightweight Aggregate Clays

Jurassic, Cretaceous, Pleistocene and Holocene clays have been utilized in brick making at over 40 brick plants in the Province since 1871. Most of the potential sites for future production are available for leasing.

The most recent brick plant to be operated in the Province was I-XL Industries Ltd.’s Red River Brick and Tile plant at Lockport. From 1971 to 1992, over 16 million bricks were manufactured, in three different sizes as well as two sizes of paving brick (Gunter, 1989). Five quarries produced 8 types of clays and shales from which it was possible to make face brick in colours from red to near white, including variegations and browns, blacks, buff, tans, etc. (Shayna, 1975). Currently, all brick used in the Province is imported or is reclaimed from previous buildings.

Kildonan Concrete Products Limited made concrete block and redi-mix concrete from clinker. Pleistocene lacustrine clay, deposited in glacial Lake Agassiz, was extracted from 1955 to 1997, next to Kildonan's plant in St. Boniface. Echo-Lite Aggregate Ltd. began production of lightweight aggregate in 1961. All lightweight aggregate is imported into the Province.

Kaolin

Kaolin from the Cretaceous Swan River Formation in the Sylvan area, north of Arborg, is under investigation by Dawson Resources Limited. In 1992, a 90.7 kg bulk sample of kaolinitic clay underwent bench scale tests by the Minerals Research Laboratory (M.R.L.) of North Carolina State University. The studies concluded that the Arborg deposit could yield approximately 23 tonnes of premium grade kaolin and 60 tonnes of container glass sand for each 100 tonnes of raw ore mined (Schlesinger and Tanner, 1993).

In 1992, a 90.7 kg bulk sample of kaolinitic clay from the Arborg occurrence underwent bench scale tests by the Minerals Research Laboratory (M.R.L.) of North Carolina State University. The studies concluded that, with a slight reduction in heavy mineral content, the clay could be used as a paper and paint filler and sanitaryware body, electrical porcelain body and fine dinnerware body (Schlesinger and Tanner, 1993).

A whiteware market study prepared for the Department in 1996 indicated that an opportunity for growth and expansion of the Canadian Ceramic Industry existed in Manitoba. Electrical insulators, sanitaryware, stoneware and bone china were recommended products (Khan and Triple S Community Futures Development Corporation, 1996).

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