MINERAL INVENTORY FILE NO.
867
______________________________________________________________________________________________________
PRODUCT
Dolomite
NTS AREA
62I3
REF.
DOL 1
______________________________________________________________________________________________________
NAME OF PROPERTY
Stony Mountain
City of Winnipeg Quarries
(East and West)
OWNER OF OPERATOR ADDRESS
City of Winnipeg Equipment and Materials
Service Branch
102-1155 Pacific Avenue
Winnipeg, Manitoba R3E 3P1
OBJECT LOCATED
____________
MINING DIVISION
__________
Latitude
50 05'45"
Longitude
97 13'00"
Uncertainty (m)
50m
UTM Zone
_____
Easting
_______
Northing
_______
L.S./Quarter Section
___
Section
11, 12, 14
Township
13
Range
2 EPM
DESCRIPTION OF DEPOSIT
Stony Mountain is a rounded hill 15 to 24 m higher than the surrounding plain. It comprises an outlier of the Gunton and Penitentiary Members of the Ordovician Stony Mountain Formation. Approximately 15 m of section is exposed, consisting of 6 m (only 3.5 in the quarries) of pale yellow-buff, faintly mottled, finely crystalline dolomite of the Gunton Member underlain by about 6 m of dusky yellow to reddish and greenish-grey argillaceous dolomite of the Penitentiary Member; the latter shows abundant fossil casts and molds. Underlying the Penitentiary Member is about 20m (3 m exposed) of greenish to purple-grey argillaceous limestone interbedded with calcareous shale of the Gunn Member. The overburden averages 0.4 m in thickness in the quarry area.
Chemical Properties: CaC03 from 48.6 - 63.79% and MgC03 from 14.85 - 44.19%. For Chemical analyses see Wells (1905), Parks (1916), and Goudge (1944).
Physical Properties: For physical properties see Parks (1916).
Uses: Crushed stone for street paving and as asphalt filler, dimension stone, crushed stone for concrete aggregate (from the Gunton); crushed stone and decorative stone slabs (from the Penitentiary and Gunn).
ASSOCIATED MINERALS OR PRODUCTS OF VALUE
N/A
HISTORY OF EXPLORATION AND DEVELOPMENT
The crushing plant for the Stony Mountain quarry is located in l.s. 3, Sec 15, Tp. 13, R. 2E, about 24 km north of Winnipeg.
1900: The Gunn quarry located on the northwest face of the hill is l.s. 14, Sec. 11, Tp. 13, R. 2 EPM, was being operated by John Gunn & Sons of Winnipeg.
1905: The quarry was producing rubble and crushed stone. According to Wells (1905) the quarry was 30 m2; the working face was 6 m thick overlain by 15 cm of overburden, but the quarry was reported to be 12 m deep (Dowling, 1900 and Wells, 1905). The quarry had tow steam drills and a steam derrick, a crushing outfit and a draw kiln. The top of the kiln was level with the quarry floor so crushed stone was easily carted to the shaft of the kiln. The lime (grey and slow slaking) was drawn out of the bottom and shovelled directly into boxcars on the spur to the Canadian Pacific Railway. The City of Winnipeg purchased a quarry site in l.s. 2 and 3, Sec. 14 across a road allowance north of the Gunn quarry. They moved the mill (and much of the town) dismantled from Little Stony Mountain and reassembled it on the quarry site (See I.M.I. card 62 H/14 STN 1). A new quarry was also being opened up 0.8 km east of the Gunn quarry by the Manitoba Construction Company of Winnipeg.
1913: The City of Winnipeg quarry was 450 m long by 50 m wide; 15 cm of overburden were stripped near the middle but it deepened to 1.2 m at the northeast end. In quarrying, holes 6 m deep were sunk 1.2 m back from the face and 1.2 - 1.5 m apart. Dynamite is used to blow the whole face down onto the floor. The comapny had three crushers, 1 electric drill and three steam drills. 50 400 m3 of crushed stone were produced. Manitoba Quarries Limited now held the old Gunn quarry. It was only about 300 m long and the working face was 3.5 m high. The quarry was not being worked in 1913 but a 113 tonne crusher was installed and a spur connected to the property with the railway. Manitoba Quarries also held the Kelly Quarry (formerly Modern Quarry Co.) in l.s. 15 and 16, Sec. 11, Tp. 13. (It may have been the Manitoba Construction Company Quarry). The excavation was 90 m by 45 m and 3.5 m deep.
1924: The City of Winnipeg installed a central concrete mixing plant on Ross Avenue and began shipping their stone there. After the overburden was removed by hand labour and dumped, and the face had been blasted, the stone was trammed to the crusher on 0.9 and 0.4 m3 skips on a narrow gauge railway track. The skips were hauled by horses and dumped into the crusher from a triple. The crusher was on the side of the hill so the hopper was level with the quarry floor. A 15 m elevator carried the stone to the seizing screens.
1927: The city quarry was now 245 m2 and 4.2 m deep. An electric shovel removed the 75 cm of overburden. Cable-hauled trams were now bing used to haul the stone to the crusher. The quarry supplied the city streets and Canadian Pacific Railway with crushed stone and the CPR with rubble. Ten 25 m3 carloads of crushed stone were being produced daily. The old Gunn quarry (now about 460 m by 300 m by 3 m) was not in operation.
1928: The Municipality of Rockwood was operating the old Gunn quarry for crushed stone.
1944: About 1944 the City of Winnipeg acquired to old Gunn quarry from the Municipality of Rockwood. It was now separated from the city quarry by road allowance. They proposed to quarry the stone in the road allowance and extend operations into the Gunn quarry. The City replaced the narrow gauge tracks with modern quarry trucks. The working face wsa 4.2 m high. A spur track from the Arborg branch of the C.P.R. served the quarry. The chief product was crushed but asphalt filler was also produced and material crushed to under 5 mm was widely shipped for use as tennis court dressing. The Kelly quarry was no longer in operation.
1946: 23 500 tonnes of dolomite were quarried and screened by the City for use as road metal.
1947: A grate hammer mill was installed to replace the secondary gyratory crushers: 59 440 tonnes of crushed stone were produced.
1951: Work on a new crushing and screening plant was started. Production was 106 300 tonnes.
1953: Production was 160 600 tonnes.
1957: The City of Winnipeg acquired the Kelly quarry and 4.2 hectares of land in the northwest corner of Sec. 12 (just east of Kelly's quarry).
1964: The old City quarry was now 300 m by 540 m with a maximum depth of 7.8 m. There was a pit in the quarry floor 240 m by 69 m, 1.8 into the Penitentiary Member. The old Gunn quarry was 600 m by 150 m with a maximum depth of about 10 m. The old Kelly's quarry was 300 m by 200 m by 2.7 m. Quarrying location lease M527 was taken out by the City of Winnipeg to cover the road allowance to the east of the Old Kelly quarry.
1970: The pit in northwest 1/4 of Sec. 12, (east of the old Kelly Quarry) was not 600 m by 120 m.
1975: Lease M527 was cancelled.
1978: Quarrying continued to the southeast of the old Kelly quarry.
1978: Bison Rock products Ltd. re-opened the old quarry in l.s. 1, Sec. 14, and produced crushed stone.
1991-1993: The quarry known as City of Winnipeg West (03-14-13-2E1) was shut down, blasting was ceased but extraction was still occurring. Operation did not occur in the area known as City of Winnipeg Quarry East (Sec. 12, Tp. 13, Rge.. 2EPM, l.s. 13) since 1992 of earlier.
1993: City of Winnipeg West and East both were not in production.
1994: During 1994 City of Winnipeg East remained closed while City of Winnipeg West was opened and extraction was occurring.
1995: Both the East and West quarries were inactive.
HISTORY OF PRODUCTION
1900: The Gunn quarry was being operated by John Gunn & Sons of Winnipeg.
1905: The quarry was producing crushed stone, rubble and lime. The City of Winnipeg purchased a quarry site they reassembled the mill and much of the town dismantled from Little Stony Mountain. The Manitoba Construction Company opened a new quarry 0.8 km east of the Gunn quarry.
1913: The City of Winnipeg quarry produced 50 400 m3 of crushed stone. Manitoba Quarries Limited held the old Gunn quarry but it was not being worked. They also held the Kelly quarry (formerly Modern Quarry Company). Production from the City quarry to 1913 averaged 52 700 cubic meters except for 1906 when production ws 89 600 cubic meters.
1927: Ten 25 m3 car loads of crushed stone were being produced daily by the City quarry. The old Gunn quarry was not in operation.
1928: The municipality of Rockwood was operating the old Gunn quarry for crushed stone.
1944: About 1944 The City of Winnipeg acquired the old Gunn quarry from the Municipality of Rockwood. The chief product was crushed stone for concrete aggregate and mastic pavements but asphalt filler was also produced and material crushed to under 5 mm was widely shipped for use as tennis court dressing.
1946: 23 500 tonnes of dolomite were quarried and screened by the City for use as road metal.
1947: 49 400 tonnes of crushed stone were produced in 1947, 76 000 tonnes in 1948, 64 000 tonnes in 1949, 127 000 tonnes in 1950, 106 000 in 1951, 100 000 tonnes in 1952 and 160 600 tonnes in 1953.
1978: The City is now quarrying to the southeast of the old Kelly quarry.
1978-1992: Bison Rock Products Ltd. re-opened the quarry in l.s. Sec. 14.
1992-1995: The Stony Mountain Quarry is non-operational.
REFERENCES
Ann. Repts., Man. Mines Br., 19th, p. 84; 20th. 105-106; 21st, p. 92; 22nd, p. 87; 23rd, p. 91; 24th, p. 91; 26th, p. 85.
Baillie, A.D.
1952: Ordovician Geology of Lake Winnipeg and Adjacent Areas; Manitoba Mines Branch, Published 51-6, p. 18-21.
Bannatyne, B.B.
1971: Industrial Minerals of the Sedimentary Area of Southern Manitoba; Geological Association of Canada, Special Paper No. 9, p. 245.
Davies, J.F., Bannatyne, B.B., Barry, G.S., and McCabe, H.R.
1962: Geology and Mineral Resources of Manitoba; Manitoba Mines Branch, p. 136 and 170.
Dowling, D.B. (and Tyrrell)
1900: Report on the Geology of the West Shore and Islands of Lake Winnipeg; Geological Survey of Canada, Ottawa, p. 88F and 90F; Annual Report 1898.
Geological Association Canada, and Mineral Association Canada
1970: Guidebook, Field Trip No. 5, Lower Paleozoic of the Interlake area, Manitoba; 23rd Annual Meeting, p. 11.
Goudge, M.F.
1944: Limestones of Canada, Their Occurrence and Characteristics, Pt. V, western Canada; No. 811; Mines Branch, Ottawa, p. 33-36.
Goudge, M.F.
1930: I-Preliminary Report on the Limestones of Northern and Western Ontario and of the Prairie Provinces; Investigations of Mineral Resources and the Mining Industry, 1928, No. 710, Mines Branch, Ottawa.
Industrial Minerals Geologist's File, Man. M.R.D.
Parks, W.A.
1916: Report on the Building and Ornamental Stones of Canada, Vol. IV; Mines Branch, Ottawa, pp. 66-70, 72-76.
Wells, J. Walter:
1905: Preliminary Report on the Limestones and the Lime Industry of Manitoba; Mines Branch, Ottawa, Report Number 7, p. 48-49.
Bamburak, James, Bezys, Ruth:
1995: Capital Region Project, Quarry Descriptions 1995.
Bennett, Lynda:
1996: Personal Communication.
MAP REFERENCES
Map 12, Industrial Minerals Producers (Index), 1:1 000 000, Manitoba Mineral Resources Division.
Map 51-56, Lake Winnipeg and Adjacent Areas (Geol.), 1:506 980, Accomp. Publ. 51-56 by Ballie (1951), Manitoba Mines Branch.
Figure 4, Ordovician Stratigraphic Cross-Section Accomp. Publication 51-56 by Baillie (1952, Manitoba Mines Branch).
Map 62 I/3b, Stony Mountain (topographic), 1:25 000, Surveys and Mapping Branch, Ottawa.
Plates I and II (pages 9 & 10), Location Map and Detail Map 1:253 440 and 1:47 520, Accomp. Thesis on Stony Mountain and Stonewall Formations, by D.L. Smith, 1963, University of Manitoba.
Rockwood AN35
Geological Highway Map of Manitoba (1994), Sc. 1:1 000 000, Manitoba Mineral Resources Division.
Mineral Map of Manitoba (1980), Sc. 1:1 000 000, Manitoba Mineral Resources Division.
URL
N/A
REMARKS
The Tower Quarry, a small shallow quarry was operated in connection with Stony Mountain Penitentiary to obtain stone for building purposes. It is located on the Penitentiary Grounds: l.s. 16, Sec. 2, Tp. 13, Rge.. 2 EPM. A large quarry pit is located in l.s. 1, Sec. 14, Tp. 13 Rge.. 2 EPM.
In 1916 Kelly Bros. and Mitchell owned the land, but no work had been done. No more information is available on the later removal of a large quantity of Gunton dolomite; the quarry was re-opened by Bison Rock Products Ltd. in 1978. Manitoba Quarries, Limited owned a 2 hectare property where stone was formerly quarried for lime burning, referred to by Parks (1916) as at southwest corner of Sec. 13, Tp. 13 Rge.. 2E (Stony Mountain).

This site is known to have fossils of brachiopods and corals in the quarry.

UQI of City of Winnipeg Quarry East: IQ/ 13-12-13-02E1
UQI of City of Winnipeg Quarry West: IQ/ 03-14-13-02E1
NOTES
N/A
Compiled/Revised by:
NLL KH
Date
07-1978 05-1996