MINERAL INVENTORY FILE NO.
966
______________________________________________________________________________________________________
PRODUCT
TYNDALL STONE
NTS AREA
62I/2 SW
REF.
STN 2
______________________________________________________________________________________________________
NAME OF PROPERTY
Garson Quarry
OWNER OF OPERATOR ADDRESS
(Garson Limestone Co. Ltd. and Garson Quarries Ltd.)
OBJECT LOCATED
Tyndall Stone Quarry
MINING DIVISION
Winnipeg
Latitude
50 94'40"
Longitude
96 42'19"
Uncertainty (m)
50
UTM Zone
_____
Easting
_______
Northing
_______
L.S./Quarter Section
3, 4
Section
10
Township
13
Range
6 EPM
DESCRIPTION OF DEPOSIT
The quarry is situated on a low anticlinal ridge about 0.8 km wide and 4.8 km long that trends northwest-southeast. The covering of soil varies from 2 to 4 m along the axis and deepens on both flanks. Tyndall stone is a mottled dolomitic limestone and at this locality is in the lower half of the Selkirk member of the Ordovician Red River Formation. The rock is composed of a matrix of light buff limestone in which occur tubular and interconnected mottled areas of brownish dolomitic limestone forming one third of the rock and distributed uniformly throughout it. The upper 2.5 to 5 m is buff in color, the next 4 m has a grey to bluish cast, while the remaining 10 m (unquarried) is lighter colored. Large fossils, usually white are scattered through the rock but the stone can be cut to avoid these. The stone occurs in "beds" caused by stylolitization of 0.5 to 1.8 m thick. (See Fig. 1 on the back of this sheet). The beds have been lettered 'A' to 'K' Increasing amounts of chert modules have been found below the 'I' bed.
Chemical Properties: Analyses of individual, quarried beds range from 83.21 to 89.26% CaCo3 and 14.91 to 9.43% MgCO3. See Goudge, 1944.
Physical Properties: For physical properties relating to the use of the stone for building purposes, see Parks (1916).
Uses: Building stone, Monumental and Ornamental Stone, Flagstone, crushed stone, lime (pre-1942); also used in sulphide pulp industry.
ASSOCIATED MINERALS OR PRODUCTS OF VALUE
N/A
HISTORY OF EXPLORATION AND DEVELOPMENT
Garson quarry is located in l.s. 3 and 4, sec. 10 on the north side of Hwy 44 in Garson, Manitoba, about 48 km northeast of Winniopeg.
1895 - Wm. Garson opened the first quarry operated in the district.
1905 - The quarry was owned and operated by the Garson Quarry Company of Winnipeg. The quarry was equipped with 3 steampowered rock drills, a steam powered lathe, 3 steam powered derricks and 3 horse powered derricks. In the southeast corner there were 4 draw-kilns (12 m high) with the mouths of the shafts on level witht he surface so that carts could dump directly into the shaft so that carts could dump directly into the shaft which was lined with fire-bricks. The quick-lime was drawn off at the bottom and hoisted up into boxcars on the spurtrack from Tyndall. The burning which took 7 days produced an excellent grade of strong white quicklime which was produced in addition to the stone.
1913 - Garson's Quarry was under the management of Northwest Quarries Co. Ltd. (Wallace 1912).
1916 - The quarry was being operated by Wallace Sandstone Quarries Limited. The quarry dimensions were about 450 m east-west by 150 m north-south. After the over-burden and upper shattered beds had been removed, a channel cut was run across the quarry about 1.5 m back from the face. Two cross channels were made at each end of the strip and the key block removed. The strip was raised by plug and feathers then cut into lengths 2 to 4.5 m by plug and feathers. The company maintained a mill on the property in which a large part of the output was worked into dressed stone, cut stone, rubble and lime were produced.
1917 - The plant was destroyed by fire and quarrying ceased.
1944 - Garson Limestone Co. Ltd. was formed by Sama nd Mal Juravsky.
1946 - Production of limestone rubble sold to pulp and paper plants began in this quarry and Western Stone's No. 1 quarry. (See IMI card 62I/2 STN 4). The dimensions of the Garson quarry (Goudge 1944) were 365 m long eastwest and 180 m wide at the west end tapering to 30 m at the east end, by 5.5 m deep. Proudction between 1946 and 1955 averaged 5000 tonnes of rubble.
1962 - Quarying was carried on for building stone. A diamond saw with a 244 cm diameter blade was purchased which boosted production 4 times over channelling. It could produce only 18.6 m2 per day. The first vertical cuts (1.8 m apart) were made by the diamond saw (by a channelling machine prior to 1962) on a 29 m track. Cross breaks were made by drilling holes every 22 cm with pneumatic drills then drilling in steel plugs. The block was separated from the underlying bed by pounding steel wedges into 25 cm flat holes, 76 cm apart. Cranes lifted the blocks onto trucks for shipment to their dressing plant in Winnipeg.
1969 - The quarry ceased production about 1969.
HISTORY OF PRODUCTION
1962 - Quarrying was being carried on for building stone. Production was boosted 4-fold by the purchase of a diamond daw with 244 cm blade.
1969 - Quarry ceased about 1969.
Shipping Point - Garson, Manitoba
Material Shipped - Tynall Stone
Destination - Winnipeg
Distance from Mine - 48 km
Carrier - Truck
REFERENCES
Wallace, R.C. and Greer, L. 1927: The Non-Metallic Mineral Resources of Manitoba, Industrial Development Board of Manitoba, p. 9-19.
Wallace, R.C. 1913: Pseudobrecciation of Ordovician Limestone in Manitoba; The Journal of Geology, Vol. XXI, No. 5 July-August, p. 402-421.
MAP REFERENCES
N/A
URL
N/A
REMARKS
N/A
NOTES
N/A