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Notable provisions of the Forest Health Protection Regulation

The following are some of the notable and important provisions of this regulation. Please refer directly to the regulation for more detailed information.

Required documents:

Every person transporting raw forest products or nursery stock in Manitoba, including persons transporting raw forest products or nursery stock within Manitoba or through Manitoba to a destination elsewhere, must have a bill of lading or manifest in his or her possession that

  1. identifies the species of forest product or nursery stock being transported;
  2. shows the specific location where the forest products or nursery stock are from and their intended destination; and
  3. identifies the specific treatments used on the forest products or nursery stock, if the forest products or nursery stock have been treated to prevent forest threats.

Import restrictions on pine wood:

To prevent the spread of mountain pine beetle into Manitoba, no person shall bring untreated pine wood with bark intact into Manitoba from British Columbia, Alberta or the municipality of Maple Creek and Cypress Hills Provincial Park in Saskatchewan. The following states from the United States are restricted as well; Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, South Dakota, Washington, Wyoming and Utah. The Mexican states of Sonora and Chihuahua are also restricted. These restrictions do not apply to pine nursery stock.

Import restrictions on ash wood:

To prevent the spread of emerald ash borer into Manitoba, no person shall bring ash nursery stock, raw ash forest products or pallets, dunnage and other packing material containing ash into Manitoba from a regulated area unless it has been treated (area regulated for emerald ash borer by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency).

Restrictions to prevent Dutch elm disease:

To prevent the spread of Dutch elm disease, the following restrictions are in place:

  • A person shall not store elm wood for any purpose – including storing it while the wood is offered for sale or trade – unless the person removes the bark or treats or chips the wood.
  • No person shall transport all or part of an elm tree with bark intact unless the person has obtained and is in possession of an elm transport permit (exceptions are made when transporting directly to a designated elm wood disposal site).
  • No person shall prune an elm tree between April 1 and July 31, unless the tree poses a safety hazard, the tree obstructs traffic or traffic signs, the pruning is part of a therapeutic treatment for forest pests, or the pruning is authorized by the director.
  • No person shall remove an elm tree without treating the stump by debarking to the soil line or by grinding or removing the stump to a depth of 10 cm or more below the soil line.

Import and storage permits related to the above restrictions are available under certain circumstances. For more information on this, and on wood treatment options, please refer directly to the regulations.

Regulated pests:

Forest Threats
  • Armillaria root disease (Armillaria spp.)
  • Asian long-horned beetle (Anoplophora glabripennis)
  • Banded elm bark beetle (Scolytus schevyrewi)
  • Brown spruce longhorn beetle (Tetropium fuscum)
  • Dutch elm disease (Ophiostoma novo-ulmi and Ophiostoma ulmi)
  • Dwarf mistletoe (Arceuthobium americanum & Arceuthobium pusillum)
  • Eastern larch beetle (Dendroctonus simplex)
  • Emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis)
  • Gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar)
  • Jack pine budworm (Choristoneura pinus pinus)
  • Mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae)
  • Native elm bark beetle (Hylurgopinus rufipes)
  • Oak wilt (Ceratocystis fagacearum)
  • Pine shoot beetle (Tomicus piniperda)
  • Sirex wood wasp (Sirex noctilio)
  • Smaller European elm bark beetle (Scolytus multistriatus)
  • Spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana)
  • Sudden oak death (Phytophthora ramorum)
Invasive forest threats
  • Asian long-horned beetle (Anoplophora glabripennis)
  • Banded elm bark beetle (Scolytus schevyrewi)
  • Brown spruce longhorn beetle (Tetropium fuscum)
  • Emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis)
  • Gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar)
  • Mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae)
  • Oak wilt (Ceratocystis fagacearum)
  • Pine shoot beetle (Tomicus piniperda)
  • Sirex wood wasp (Sirex noctilio)
  • Smaller European elm bark beetle (Scolytus multistriatus)
  • Sudden oak death (Phytophthora ramorum)