Technical Program/Abstracts

Listed below by session

From Grassroots Exploration to Mine Site Rehabilitation: A Manitoba Perspective

Opening Session

Development Highlights

Exploration and Geoscience Projects I

Exploration and Geoscience Projects II

Exploration and Geoscience Projects III

iMaQs and Map Gallery Demonstration

Keynote Speaker

Other 2012 links

d2012 Speaker bios

 

From Grassroots Exploration to Mine Site Rehabilitation: A Manitoba Perspective

Affecting Change and the Duty to Consult–International to Local
O. Mercredi

Ovide Mercredi presents facts and insights on the historical legacies of Canada that led to the segregation and impoverishment of the Indigenous Nations and people, including the history of Treaties 1 to 11, with a focus on the numbered Treaties. Drawing on his extensive national and international advocacy experience and knowledge, Ovide's discussion of the Treaties relates to the duty to consult in connection with Canadian federalism and the mining industry. Presenting his views on options and alternatives to the status quo, Ovide speaks openly to Canadians, politicians, policy makers and corporate leaders about the legacy of neglect and segregation of Aboriginal people. Ovide directs the way forward by identifying opportunities for equality, social justice, economic and wealth development – aimed at securing a strong, restorative, and rewarding future for Canada's Aboriginal people.

 

Beyond Trinkets and Beads
S. Jackson and H. Urton (Marcel Colombe Development Corporation)

Watch Presentation

Mining activities have been a large part of life in northern Manitoba. Whether it's mineral exploration, mining or site remediation, the activities offer opportunities for First Nations. The Marcel Colomb First Nation has taken steps to become partners in site remediation being undertaken in its traditional territory. With positive results on the exploration front, the First Nation has entered into a Memorandum of Understanding to ensure its participation should mining development proceed. The opportunities presented by mining activities are being seized by Marcel Colomb First Nation. The challenge is to negotiate agreements that move "Beyond Trinkets and Beads".

 

Business Building Opportunities with First Nations
Bruce Reid (Carlisle Goldfields Limited)

No abstract.

 

Exploration: Getting Paid for Having Fun
T. Lewis (Wildcat Exploration Ltd.)

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I have been a geologist in the mineral exploration business for over 35 years in Canada. It is a demanding business that requires skill as a geologist, stamina to face the weather and rugged terrain, and determination to finish the job while enduring insects and criticism from groups opposed to mining but not opposed to enjoying the benefits from minerals. The most rewarding part of exploration (other than finding mines) is having fun working in the Canadian north, and the enjoyment of meeting people associated with the business.  The focus of this presentation is to explain the mineral exploration process and some of the business opportunities for aboriginal peoples across Canada. Exploration and mining has evolved over the years from development and exploitation of minerals to a more responsible approach with a commitment to work safe while protecting the environment. This attitude change occurred in the last 10 to 15 years. Running parallel to this change is a work ethic to work with local communities in a respectful and responsible manner. This approach is good business. This process is essential to successful and sustainable development. This approach is the right thing to do. We can make it to work through a better understanding of each other. 

 

Farley Reclamation Project–Lynn Lake MB
A. Steckelberg (ARCADIS)

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The presentation provides an overview for the rehabilitation of the former Farley mine site located in Lynn Lake, Manitoba. The project was performed under a cooperative agreement between the Province of Manitoba and a private mining client. Work included the development of a comprehensive site wide conceptual model to first aid in the development of a rehabilitation plan. The rehabilitation plan then included the consolidation of over 1 million cubic meters of tailings and waste rock to reduce impacts from surface water run off to the adjacent river as well as the installation of over 1.5 million square meters of geosynthetic cover materials. Work also included the treatment of over two million cubic meters of impacted water, dredging, aggregate production, dyke buttressing and road construction. There was an opportunity during the course of the project for involvement and coordination with both the Marcel Colomb First Nations Band (MCFN) and with local citizens of Lynn Lake. Due to the remote location of the site in Northern Manitoba,  involvement with local and First Nations groups were important to help with economic and resource development. To help with that development, a plan was developed to train local and First Nations personnel on both heavy equipment operation as well as environmental and mine reclamation practices. Over the course of several months of work, it was further decided to reinforce the training practices through the development of an Elder involvement program. This program included participation of a band elder to facilitate communication with all site personnel who are band members and to help ensure that project health and safety goals and technical work requirements met. In addition, as part of an aboriginal involvement requirement developed during the original tender process, the MCFN was able to set up a joint venture operation to support certain construction activities which helped to build an operations team for further initiatives. These additional initiatives include an agreement with the clients to establish an onsite man camp managed by the First Nation to provide lodging and food during the project which will then be transferrable to other projects in the North, creating an ongoing opportunity for First Nations members.



Lighting the 8th Fire–Partnerships and Working Together
W. Kinew (Indie Ends Production)

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Drawing on lessons from the stories and research on the acclaimed television show "8th Fire", which he hosted, along with other best practices, Wab Kinew shows how partnerships with Aboriginal communities can be so much more than just "duties" and "obligations" but in fact opportunities to add value to projects and corporations. While past generations focused on the differences between the visions for Indigenous communities and other Canadians, there are now many people who are doing exciting things to build relationships based on mutual benefit and a shared destiny. Many corporations are waking up to the reality that the “baby boom” in Indigenous communities offers the potential to be at least a partial solution to the skilled labour shortage in Canada. Others recognize that partnerships and impact benefits agreements are a better way to develop natural resource projects than risking acrimony, litigation and civil unrest. Kinew provides an overview of these arguments while also providing a third rationale: that the Indigenous people’s culture, way of life and world view, offer a chance to create innovation and reexamine “business as usual”.

 

Mineral Business–Engagement and Consultation–Building Understanding for Success: The Business Case
M.A. Mihychuk (CR Services)

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Mineral industry essentials presentation goes through the cycle of a mineral project from exploration production to closure. Certainty and confidentially are critical as risks and costs are high. Timelines extremely long, with the development stage alone can take between 5 to 20 years.The mineral and mining business is extremely complex and involves a wide variety of geological and financial professionals working alongside others with technical skills and communities. This presentation is an overview of the industry, explaining concepts and bringing an appreciation of how its various parts link up, Successful resource revenue sharing model will be explored.  This is an introduction to the business of minerals and provide a foundation of the an industry which underpins our everyday life for northerners and all Manitobans.

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Opening Session

Investing in Tomorrow
W. Kinew (Indie Ends Production)

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Based upon his professional experience and conversations with business leaders Wab Kinew takes a look forward at Canada's key role in the global economy and how partnerships with Aboriginal communities can help facilitate Canada's role as financial stabilizer amidst global turmoil. In spite of some signs of a continuing global slowdown, Canada’s economy continues to show signs of resilience. At the same time, falling commodity prices and growing uncertainty around China’s economic future has sown seeds of doubt as to whether Canadian industries will continue to “Weather the Storm”. Kinew focuses on the positive and argues that demand for Canadian commodities will continue over the medium to long-term. Apparent slowdowns in the production of natural resources caused by dipping commodity prices can be viewed by First Nations, Indigenous communities and their potential corporate partners as an opportunity to “get things right”. Now is the time to strike the right agreements, joint ventures and memorandums so that when demand ramps up, both Indigenous communities and corporations are in a strong position to proceed with development, find the right labour force and enjoy a mutually beneficial relationship.

 

Manitoba Mineral Exploration and Development Trends 2012
C.J. Beaumont-Smith (Manitoba Minerals Policy and Business Development)

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Manitoba is experiencing remarkable growth in new mine development and advanced exploration. The development of two new mines and the potential reopening of several more are resulting in record capital investments. Exploration spending levels remain high; a trend that is being tempered by the recent steep decline in commodity prices, which has produced challenging equity markets and precipitated a reassessment of many exploration projects. The presentation will highlight provincial exploration trends, provide an overview of current exploration projects in Manitoba and update the status of advanced exploration and development projects.

 

Overview of 2012 Activities of the Manitoba Geological Survey
R. Syme (Manitoba Geological Survey)

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In 2012, the Manitoba Geological Survey embarked on a multi-year program to update geological mapping in the northern and central Superior Province, with bedrock mapping at Oxford Lake and Horseshoe Lake, and Quaternary mapping at Knee Lake. A new bedrock mapping program was also begun in the western Flin Flon Belt, in an area that had not been mapped since 1951. Lake water levels finally allowed bedrock mapping at Sipiwesk Lake in the Pikwitonei Domain. Fieldwork continued in the Snow Lake area and the Thompson Nickel Belt (TNB), building on earlier work. New work was undertaken to better define the setting of a number of commodities, including gold (in the Rice Lake Belt), rare earth elements (at in southeast Manitoba and southwest of Lynn Lake) and nickel (in the Mayville area of southeastern Manitoba). Phanerozoic investigations focused on evaluation of the potential for shallow unconventional Cretaceous shale gas in southwestern Manitoba and the potential for petroleum in certain formations in southern Manitoba as well as in the Hudson Bay Basin.

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Development Highlights

Lalor Project Update
K. Proctor and K. Hoover (Hudbay)

The Lalor Deposit was discovered near the Town of Snow Lake, Manitoba in March 2007 and has since evolved into a fast track development project with a commitment of $704M from Hudbay. Underground development started December 2009 and surface construction in spring 2011. All surface infrastructures required for the production shaft sinking are now complete. The ventilation shaft sinking was completed this spring and has been converted to a hoisting plant, with first ore hoisted August 14th. Underground development is advancing on schedule with focus on intersecting the production shaft on the 910m level, and the construction of off shaft infrastructures such as conveyor, sumps, ore/waste raises. Basic engineering and long lead procurement in support of the new concentrator continues. The concentrator is designed for a throughput of 4,500 tonnes per day. The flowsheet includes crushing, SAG and ball mill grinding circuit, copper and zinc flotation, concentrate dewatering, and a paste backfill plant. Construction of the concentrator is expected to start in spring 2013 with commissioning late in 2014. This presentation will provide a snapshot of key project milestones, with particular focus on the accomplishments of this past successful year of construction. The Lalor deposit is the largest pre-development deposit Hudbay Minerals Inc. has discovered in the Flin Flon-Snow Lake region, and will take Hudbay to the anniversary of 100 years mining in this region.

 

San Gold’s Transition from Explorer to Producer
I. Berzins (San Gold Corporation)

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The Rice Lake Gold Mine located in Bissett, Manitoba began production in 1935 and to-date has produced over 1.6 million ounces of gold.  In June 2005 San Gold Corporation (“San Gold”) purchased the Rice Lake Gold Mine from Harmony Gold Mining Company (“Harmony Gold”) and a new junior mining company, focused on exploration and development of gold, emerged.   Since acquiring the Rice Lake assets San Gold has invested over $270 million into surface and underground infrastructure as well funding an aggressive regional exploration program.  As a result of these investments San Gold is on track to produce 100,000 ounces of gold on an annualized basis and has increased its global resource to 4.1 million ounces of gold.  The mill is currently operating at a throughput rate of approximately 2,400 tons per day which is double the name plate capacity of one year ago.  All ore is generated from underground workings capable of producing approximately 1,600 tons per day of mill feed.  The majority of the current mill feed is coming from deposits that were not even known to the company five years ago.  This paper will discuss the emergence of the Shoreline Basalt as a new mineralized structure, the consolidation of the Rice Lake belt and the development strategy and infrastructure investments which have allowed San Gold to be operating at levels never previously achieved.

 

Where are the Capital Markets?
G. Glenn (Auriga Gold Corp.)

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Auriga's Maverick Gold Project represents a significant gold development project with forecast gold production of over 40,000 oz per annum. In our presentation we highlight the development potential of the project and ask "Where are the capital markets?" to support its funding requirements and properly value the company and its assets.

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Exploration and Geoscience Projects I

Assessing the Potential for Base and Precious Metals, Uranium, Rare Earth and Platinum-Group Elements in Northwestern Manitoba with New Regional Lake Sediment Geochemical Data
M. McCurdy and E. Grunsky (Geological Survey of Canada)

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Lake sediment samples were collected in 1975 from four contiguous NTS map sheets in northwestern Manitoba adjacent to Kasmere Lake and Nueltin Lake, south of the Nunavut-Manitoba border. A subset of these sediment samples archived in Ottawa were reanalyzed by currently available commercial methods and replace the 1975-vintage 12-element data set with a modern, precise data set of 62 elements revealing new targets for base and precious metals, uranium, rare earths and platinum-group elements. These data were integrated with recently reanalyzed lake sediments from Nunavut to form a large, contiguous block of internally consistent geochemical data. These data were used to outline areas favourable for economic mineral exploration. Several areas within the boundaries of this survey warrant further exploration. Using statistical analytical methods in combination with existing geological maps, lake sediment data were used to create ‘predictive maps’ to differentiate and refine existing geological boundaries and lithologies.  As the data are compositional in nature, there is the potential problem of the "closure" effect for which specific statistical methods have been developed for interpreting such data. A log-centred transform was applied followed by a principal component analysis from which features related to lithologic variability, surficial geology and mineral occurrences were shown to be evident.  The initial results and interpretation of the lake sediment geochemistry show a strong predictive capability for the known Archean and Proterozoic age supracrustal and intrusive units. 

 

Early Thrust Imbrications within the McLeod Road–Birch Lake Thrust Panel and Implications on Gold Mineralization at the New Britannia Mine, Snow Lake, Manitoba
K. Rubingh (Laurentian University)

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Improved understanding of the volcanic stratigraphy and structural history of the McLeod Road-Birch Lake Thrust (MB) panel suggests that duplication within the MB panel occurred during early thrusting and was followed by the formation of the NorAcme anticline and its axial planar cleavage. The NorAcme anticline was then cut by a second set of thrust faults (e.g. McLeod Road thrust-MRT) that may have formed during the same progressive deformation. The MRT is reactivated as a sinistral shear zone during the formation of a late north-trending cleavage that overprints the thrust and the NorAcme anticline. These structures were last deformed during the formation of the open northeast-trending Threehouse synform. Gold mineralisation at the New Britannia mine is structurally controlled; it spatially occurs in the hanging wall of both MRT and Howe Sound Fault and it is consistently found along lithological contacts and secondary fault structures in the hinge area of the Nor Acme anticline. The relative timing of these structures is therefore important in determining the emplacement of gold mineralization. In this talk I will discuss two possible interpretations of the structural evolution and architecture of the panel focussing on the structures hosting gold mineralization.

 

Geoscience Advances in Manitoba’s Far North
C. Böhm (Manitoba Geological Survey)

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The 2008-2011 Manitoba Far North Geomapping Initiative of the Manitoba Geological Survey, in partnership with the Geological Survey of Canada under the Geomapping for Energy and Minerals (GEM) program, was designed to further our understanding of the nature, evolution and mineral potential of the southeast margin of the Archean Hearne craton. Supported by geophysical, geochemical and geochronological data, areas with known or inferred potential for base and precious metals, diamonds, uranium and rare metals were targeted for re-mapping to provide a more solid framework for mineral exploration. This presentation aims to highlight the main advances in our understanding of the regional bedrock geology that result from the Manitoba Far North Geomapping Initiative. Of particular importance for regional tectonic correlations as well as mineral exploration are: 1) a new stratigraphy and chronology of at least four metasedimentary cover sequences, some of which are being explored for uranium, gold and/or rare metals; 2) the identification of a Neoarchean greenstone belt with known gold occurrences, and; 3) the discovery of remnants of ancient cratonic lithosphere in the Seal River area, rendering the region favourable for diamond exploration.

 

New Data from Bedrock Geological Mapping in the Brunne Lake-Gurney Mine Area and Implications for Gold Mineralization
S. Gagné (Manitoba Geological Survey)

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The Flin Flon belt is mostly known for its VMS deposits, but it is also host to numerous gold occurrences including some significant gold producers. The Brunne Lake area is host to the Gurney gold mine (28 000 oz; 1937-1939) and several other historical gold showings. Results from geological investigations in the Brunne Lake area this past summer have been used to update the geological map of the area. The Brunne Lake area occupies the central portion of the Flin Flon Belt, which has not been the focus of geological investigation since the 1950’s, and is characterized by a crescent-shaped narrow belt of supracrustal rocks dominated by mafic volcanic rocks and synvolcanic gabbro dikes, with minor shallow porphyritic intrusions and felsic volcaniclastic horizons. The package of supracrustal rocks has been intruded by various plutons. New geological mapping this past summer provided new information that allows to better understand the geology of this area and how it relates to adjacent areas.

 

The Paleoproterozoic Lalor Auriferous VMS Deposit, Snow Lake, Manitoba: Preliminary Observations on the Nature and Architecture of the Hydrothermal System
P. Mercier-Langevin (Geological Survey of Canada), A. Caté (INRS-ETE), S. Duff and M. Hannington (University of Ottawa), P-S. Ross (INRS-ETE), S. Gagné (Manitoba Geological Survey), B. Dubé (Geological Survey of Canada)

The GSC, in partnership with HudBay, the MGS, the INRS-ETE and the University of Ottawa, and in collaboration with Laurentian University, recently initiated a study of the Lalor auriferous VMS deposit in Snow Lake as part of the Targeted Geoscientific Initiative Phase 4 of NRCan. Lalor is the largest deposit of the Snow lake camp and also the richest in Au with approximately 27 Mt of ore at 2.8 g/t Au (75 t Au). It is predominantly characterized by distinct Zn-Pb-Cu±Au-Ag semimassive to massive sulphide lenses and by zones of Au-Ag-Pb±Cu disseminated sulphides. The ore zones are stratigraphically and/or structurally stacked in a complexly deformed and metamorphosed succession of intensely hydrothermally altered rocks attributed to the Chisel mature arc sequence that host other Zn-rich VMS deposits. Preliminary observations indicate that there are key mineral assemblages that can be traced and possibly used to vector within the Lalor footwall alteration system. Current work aims at refining the zonation and overprinting patterns based on detailed mineralogy, mineral chemistry and lithogeochemistry of the alteration and sulphide mineral assemblages. The overall objective is to identify the critical factors that controlled Au enrichment at Lalor and further advance our understanding of the specific processes controlling precious metal enrichments in VMS systems.

 

Uranium Exploration in Northwest Manitoba
R. Polutnik (CanAlaska Uranium Ltd.)

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CanAlaska acquired the NW Manitoba Mineral Exploration Licences in 2005-2006, and commenced airborne surveys and field work in 2005. The property covers a large portion of the Wollaston Domain rocks in Manitoba, northeast of the operating uranium mines in the Athabasca. By mid 2007 the company had discovered a number of radioactive boulder trains and outcrops. Prospecting and mapping confirmed multiple styles of uranium mineralization and radioactive boulders from all rock types. Exploration permits were withheld by the Manitoba government from mid 2007 until April 2010, while community consultation protocol was developed. In early 2012 CanAlaska completed a MOU with the local community, and in March, with community support the Company carried out targeted ground geophysics on two prospective zones. The geophysical program successfully identified multiple coincident gravity and resistivity anomalies within a major structural trend hosting uranium mineralisation and hydrothermal alteration. Comparison of these zones is made with the uranium deposit at Andrew Lake, Nunavut.

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Exploration and Geoscience Projects II

Exploring the Mineral Potential of Manitoba’s Interlake Region
D. Peck, M. Huminicki, D. Berk, D. Binne and T. Tuba (White Cap Exploration Ltd.)

Manitoba’s Interlake region has seen only intermittent, prior exploration - principally for coal, oil and gas.  Metallic mineral exploration has largely been restricted to sediment-hosted Zn deposits, Prairie-type Au deposits and magmatic nickel sulfide deposits.  The Lake Winnipegosis region is currently being explored by White Cap Exploration Ltd. (WCE).  Precambrian basement targets include the southern extensions of the Winnipegosis Komatiite Belt, the Thompson Nickel Belt, the western Superior Province craton margin and the eastern (leading) edge of the Trans-Hudson Orogen.  Some of these basement domains host significant base metal and/or gold deposits where they are exposed in northern (Flin Flon, Thompson) or southeastern (e.g. Rice Lake belt) Manitoba.  The overall structural framework for the Lake Winnipegosis area is highly attractive (craton margin).  Although exploration under Phanerozoic cover (<200 to 400m thick) remains a challenge, the known mineral endowment of these domains and the availability of deep-penetrating geophysical and geochemical methods encouraged WCE to establish the dominant land position in the region.  WCE is also exploring the Phanerozoic cover sequences.  Initial surface programs returned intriguing results including G3 garnets and pelletal lapilli in surface till and interpreted vent structures.  These features, coupled with limited till and soil geochemistry data, are consistent with a Phanerozoic or younger alkali ultramafic volcanic activity (kimberlitic or carbonatitic) in the region.  Although exploration efforts have just begun, WCE remains confident that it can discover one or more significant metallic mineral deposits in this part of Manitoba’s underexplored Interlake region.

 

Mustang Minerals Corp.–Makwa Mayville Project Exploration
R. Dunbar (Mustang Minerals Corp.)        

Mustang Minerals is exploring the Makwa and Mayville Properties in SE Manitoba. Both properties have resources of copper nickel and contain significant PGM. The Company presentation will focus on the exciting exploration results from 2012 and plans for 2013.

 

New Insights from Bedrock Geological Mapping of the Mayville-Cat Lake Area into PGE-Ni-Cu-(Cr) Mineralization in the Bird River Greenstone Belt, Southeastern Manitoba
E. (Xueming) Yang (Manitoba Geological Survey)

The Mayville-Cat Lake area is located in the northern limb of the Neoarchean Bird River greenstone belt that hosts significant PGE-Ni-Cu-Cr mineralization related to the Mayville intrusion and past-producing Ni-Cu deposits associated with the Bird River Sill as well as the world class TANCO rare-metal (Cs-Ta-Li) deposit. Geological mapping indicates that the Mayville intrusion consists dominantly of anorthositic gabbro, gabbroic anorthosite and anorthosite, with subordinate melagabbro and pyroxenite at the base and gabbro at top. This intrusion is similar to Archean anorthosite complexes, and can be subdivided into a lower heterolithic breccia zone and an upper anorthosite to leucogabbro zone as suggested by detailed trench mapping. Geochemical characteristics of the Mayville intrusion suggest that the parental magma(s) was an alumina-enriched tholeiitic magma, which may have been derived from high-degree partial melting of the subcontinental lithospheric mantle and experienced assimilation and fractional crystallization during its emplacement. An early sulphide saturation event triggered by crustal contamination and/or introduced external sulphur are likely to generate magmatic sulphide Ni-Cu-PGE mineralization at the base of the intrusion, and the injection of a new batch(s) of mafic-ultramafic melt may form PGE and chromite mineralization at the transitional zone(s) of phases within the intrusion.

 

Rare Metals in Manitoba
T. Martins (Manitoba Geological Survey)

Rare metals define a large group of elements that can be found in different environments and associated with very distinct types of rocks. Examples of rare metals include Li, Cs, Ta, Be, Sn, Nb, La, Ce, Nd, Dy (and all of the rare earth elements-REE). Rare metals continue to be in high demand and can be used by a number of industries from automobile and electronics manufactures to medical applications. Specific groups of rare metals are typically associated with specific geological environments.For example deposits of Li, Cs, Ta, Sn, and Be can be found associated with granitic pegmatites whereas REE can occur associated with syenites and carbonatites.

 

Structural Study of the Ogama-Rockland Gold Deposit, Southeast Margin of the Ross River Pluton, Long Lake, Manitoba
X. Zhou (University of Waterloo)

The Archean Rice Lake greenstone belt is the most important lode gold district in Manitoba and lies in the western part of the Uchi Subprovince of the Superior Province. Unlike most gold deposits in the Rice Lake belt, which are hosted by layered gabbro sills, basalt flows or volcaniclastic rocks, the Ogama-Rockland gold deposit is hosted by granitoid intrusive rocks. This deposit is situated in the southeast margin of the Ross River Pluton, which consists mostly of granodiorite and tonalite, with minor quartz diorite, monzogranite and alkali feldspar granite. The contacts of these different intrusive phases are typically gradational. Numerous quartz-feldspar porphyry dikes, aplite dikes and a complex network of quartz veins crosscut the various phases of plutonic rocks. Auriferous quartz veins associated with the Ogama-Rockland deposit have a close spatial relationship with west-northwest to northwest-striking, subvertical, dominantly dextral brittle-ductile to ductile shear zones. Minor north-trending, subvertical, sinistral brittle-ductile shear zones are also associated with quartz veins. The shear-zone rocks are mostly granitoid mylonite, mica-quartz schist or K-feldspar-porphyroclast-bearing chlorite schist. The veins are mostly massive, but locally exhibit laminated or banded internal textures and asymmetric fabrics that indicate the same sense of shear as the hosting shear zones. They were most likely emplaced late during shearing. The ongoing detailed structural analysis of these veins will provide important new information to constrain exploration models, and will help draw attention to intrusion-hosted, shear-related, vein-type gold mineralization in the Rice Lake belt.

 

The Paint Sequence: A Newly Recognized Metasedimentary Succession in the Thompson Nickel Belt
C. Couëslan (Manitoba Geological Survey)

Recent mapping in the Paint Lake, Phillips Lake, and Manasan Falls areas have resulted in the recognition of at least one new metasedimentary succession in the Thompson Nickel Belt. Rocks of the Paint sequence consist largely of metawacke and metapsammite with subordinate meta-iron formation, metapelite, and calcareous rocks. The Paint sequence occurs along the eastern boundary of the TNB with known occurrences stretching from Phillips Lake in the south to beyond Paint Lake in the north. A possibly related supracrustal succession is present at Manasan Falls. Neodymium-model ages for Paint sequence metawacke range from ca. 3.57 to 3.22 Ga, which is generally older than Ospwagan Group model ages of ca. 3.22–2.82 Ga. Preliminary U–Pb ages of detrital zircon range from ca. 2850–2018 Ma suggesting that the Paint sequence was deposited during the Proterozoic; however, further work is required to eliminate the possibility that Proterozoic ages are the result of discordancy or the analysis of multiple age domains. Sulphidic Ospwagan Group rocks hosting ultramafic intrusions are one of the major exploration targets for Ni in the TNB. Similarities with the Ospwagan Group could result in the misidentification of Paint sequence rocks for the more economically prospective Ospwagan Group. Alternatively, the Paint sequence could represent a new exploration play for the TNB.

 

Wildcat Exploration: Positioning for the Upturn
T. Lewis (Wildcat Exploration Ltd.)

Wildcat Exploration is a Winnipeg based company exploring for gold and base metals in Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Ontario. Our management team consists of geologists, a geological engineer and financial professionals and the added depth of a knowledgeable Board of Directors and Advisory Committee. The company’s roots originate in the Rice Lake greenstone belt near Bissett, Manitoba. Of the five claim groups owned by Wildcat in this area, three are being explored under an option to San Gold. In recent years the company expanded into several prospective areas of Manitoba and elsewhere in Canada. Early in 2012 Wildcat announced the discovery of a  gold intersection in the Thompson Nickel Belt. This discovery was made while drilling for nickel on property optioned from Anglo American Exploration (Canada), located 55 km south of Thompson. In the Flin Flon greenstone belt, Wildcat used VTEM, mag and prospecting to establish drill targets on the Reed Lake property, a perimeter copper-zinc property north of the Reed copper deposit. The Reed copper deposit is currently under construction, and is jointly owned by partners Hudbay Minerals and VMS Ventures. Within the Uchi sub-province which hosts both the Red Lake and Rice Lake greenstone belts, Wildcat staked the McVicar gold property in NW Ontario and is exploring several gold zones. Finally, in the Foster River area of Saskatchewan, Wildcat holds claims over sedimentary hosted zinc mineralization in the Wollaston Domain. Although exploration is currently experiencing a downturn, this economic environment offers opportunities to acquire new properties, form new partnerships and prepare in-house properties for improved market conditions. Wildcat’s management team has recognized this trend, and has been working hard to position ourselves for the anticipated turnaround.   

 

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Exploration and Geoscience Projects III

Alto Ventures Ltd. Results from the 2012 Exploration Program at Oxford Lake, Manitoba
M. Koziol (Alto Ventures Ltd.)

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Alto’s 100% owned Oxford Lake project is located in the western Superior Province in central Manitoba, approximately 150 km southeast of Thompson and covers almost 31,000 ha. Alto Ventures is exploring for gold as the principal commodity and copper-zinc base metals deposits are secondary targets. The dominant styles of mineralization at Oxford Lake are (1) gold in sulphidized sections of banded iron formation (“BIF”) such as at the Rusty Gold Zone, and (2) gold associated with base metals copper-zinc mineralization such as Hyers Island.  The Rusty Gold Zone hosts a Historical Resource of 800,000 tonnes at an average grade of 6 g/t gold.  This Historical Resource was not prepared in compliance with NI43-101 guidelines and thus the historical estimate should not be relied upon. Alto drilled six holes on the property in 2012 to test the BIF model. Holes RUS 12-01 and 12-02 were drilled to confirm the location of the Rusty Gold Zone.  Both holes cut the Rusty horizon as planned intersecting 5.5 m grading 1.22 g/t gold in RUS12-01 and 1.5 m grading 0.97 g/t gold in RUS12-02.  Hole RUS12-03 was drilled near Blue Jay Island on strike with the Rusty Gold Zone and 2.2 km east of RUS12-02.  This hole intersected multiple zones of gold mineralization with the most significant being 6.8 m grading 5.7 g/t gold including 16.5 g/t gold over 1.0 m.  Other zones include 2.7 m grading 6.7 g/t gold and 9.0 m grading 0.88 g/t gold. Results from the 2012 drilling are most encouraging confirming “BIF” gold mineralization for over 2 km along the Rusty-Blue Jay trend and indicating potential for high grades along this trend. Mineralization is open on strike and to depth. Three holes tested several VTEM conductors delineated during Alto’s 2011 surveys and intersected inter-layered felsic tuff, metasediments and pyrrhotite-magnetite iron formation but no significant gold was obtained at the locations that were tested.

 

Development of the North Caribou Terrane and the Oxford Stull Domain through the Neoarchean: Building the Foundation for Lode Gold Mineralization
T. Corkery (MT Corkery Consulting)

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Fault bounded continental slivers record a complex history of geologic development for the northern margin of the North Caribou terrane in Central Manitoba and Northwestern Ontario. Bedrock mapping and structural, geochemical, geochronological and isotopic research in the northwestern Superior Province of Manitoba reveal a complex geologic history for the north margin of a small isolated continental landmass between ~3.1 and 2.7Ga. Cyclical periods of rifting and the formation of back arc basins, alternating with basin closure and suturing, have been documented. Each cycle of basin closure was followed by post collisional crustal adjustment concomitant with periods of magmatism and metamorphism on the craton. These events produced a fertile structural and lithological framework for formation of lode gold mineralization. Subsequent collision with the 3.6 Ga. Hudson Bay Terrane circa 2.7 Ga left the remnants of a juvenile oceanic basin, the Oxford Stull Domain along the north margin of the North Caribou Terrane.  The pre-existing sutures in the North Caribou Terrane and newly formed sutures formed in the collision with the Hudson Bay Terrane provided an extensive anastomosing set of transpressional shear zones that are now the locus of numerous gold occurrences. These sutures formed crustal scale zones of weakness that provided pathways for mineralizing fluids to migrate upward to pressure temperature regimes conducive to Gold deposition. The regionally extensive anastomosing network of transpressive shear zones thus provided the physical traps for an extensive region of lode gold mineralization. It is entirely possible that more than one mineralizing event occurred in the North Caribou Terrane, culminating in the post 2.7 Ga mineralization occurred in the juvenile Oxford Stull Domain along the Stull-Wunnummin and other regional transpression zones.

 

Geology, Structure and Economic Potential of the Western Portion of the Oxford Lake–Knee Lake Greenstone Belt, Northwestern Superior Province, Manitoba
S.D. Anderson, P.D. Kremer and T. Martins (Manitoba Geological Survey)

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As the largest contiguous greenstone belt in the northwestern Superior Province, the Oxford Lake–Knee Lake belt is central to understanding the stratigraphy, tectonic evolution and economic potential of a large and geologically diverse region that includes some of the most prospective yet under-explored greenstone belts in the Superior craton. In 2012, the Manitoba Geological Survey began a multi-year project to remap the western portion of the belt at Oxford Lake. Preliminary results of this mapping indicate that the supracrustal rocks are disposed in three fault-bounded panels and include four tectonostratigraphic assemblages, each of which is characterized by a different association of lithofacies and was likely deposited in a distinct setting. Although absolute age constraints are presently lacking, crosscutting relationships of intrusions suggest at least three broad ages of volcanism and sedimentation. Mesoscopic structures record at least three generations of ductile deformation, and include macroscopic isoclinal folds and late dextral shear zones. This talk will provide an overview of these results as they pertain to the setting of base- and precious-metal occurrences at Oxford Lake, and a general assessment of the regional economic potential.

 

Gold Mineralization in the Stull Lake Greenstone Belt
R. St. Pierre (Mega Precious Metals Inc./University of Manitoba)

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The Stull Lake Greenstone Belt located in the Oxford-Stull Domain, northwestern Superior Province is host to multiple gold occurrences and deposits. The Twin Lakes gold deposit is the largest known gold deposit within the Stull Lake belt with a current resource of 2.73 million ounces (measured, indicated, and inferred). Ongoing mapping and research has identified a strong association between scheelite and the main gold mineralization event within the Twin Lakes deposit and surrounding areas. Two other stages of gold mineralization have also been identified within the project area including quartz-tourmaline veining associated with southward dipping structures crosscut by later quartz-scheelite veins, and smoky quartz veining with higher sulphide content (unknown age relationship). Field evidence indicates an early silicification associated with the emplacement of porphyry dykes and sills. Gold mineralization is dominantly hosted within the more competent porphyries and surrounding silicified rocks which show brittle fractures and fault breccia, as opposed to ductile deformation fabrics typically observed in the surrounding rocks. Gold mineralization throughout the belt also shows strong spatial association to Timiskaming-like sedimentary rocks which will be discussed in this talk along with an overview of structural controls to gold mineralization and the main mineralization styles in the Stull Lake Greenstone Belt.

 

Mega Precious Metals–Monument Bay Gold Camp, NE Manitoba
P. Malegus (Mega Precious Metals Inc.)

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The Monument Bay Gold Camp in Manitoba is Mega Precious Metals Inc.'s (Mega) most advanced project. The project which currently hosts an NI 43-101 resource of over 2.78M* ounces of gold is located 570km northeast of Winnipeg and 340km southeast of Thompson, Manitoba. The entire district land package is over 371km2 and is 100% owned by Mega who controls the entire mineralized belt, with over 120km of proven gold bearding structures. In collaboration with the University of Manitoba, Mega’s technical team has outlined the regional geological, geochemical & structural framework of the district land package. The Monument Bay Gold Camp is currently composed of three main shear zones (Twin Lakes, AZ, and the Stull-Wunnumin) and Mega has found multiple satellite deposits and continuous gold anomalies along these shear zones. In addition, we now know that the deposit was formed by a complex pull-apart basin and this is the first time that this property is being looked at from this perspective which can host many types of ore bodies. This pull-apart basin model further demonstrated that the Monument Bay Gold Camp is a strong geological “look-alike” to the Hollinger-McIntyre Mine in the Timmins Gold Camp. The geology, mineralization, geochemistry and grades are very similar between the Monument Bay Gold Camp and the Hollinger-McIntyre Mine. Furthermore, Mega has been utilizing the substantial database of historical work to conduct our Old Core Assay Program (OCAP) which has been designed to assay previously unassayed mineralized core intervals from a library of over 75,000 m of historical core as the previous operators were testing only for narrow high grade veins. Material previously classified as waste is being converted into economic mineralization, which is increasing our resource material and potentially the grade within the proposed open pit. Mega recognizes the value that local communities, including First Nation communities, bring to project development and is committed to engaging local communities, including First Nation communities, in the area. To this end on March 19, 2012 a private placement of units of Mega’s common shares closed, whereby Red Sucker Lake First Nation acquired a position as a stakeholder of Mega, supported by the Government of Manitoba and all parties are looking forward to exploring mutually beneficial development at the Monument Bay Gold Camp.  Initiatives to date include the placement of two community liaison officers, commencement of a traditional land use mapping project and regular ongoing communication. The Manitoba Government continues to initiate the development of infrastructure in the region, including upgradable power lines, low electricity rates and the construction of all-season roads. Throughout the next exploration program Mega will continue to add ounces to the proposed open pit while conserving cash with the OCAP program, investigate the well-defined mineralized targets along the shear zones and perform a drill program to further expand the mineralized targets and satellite deposits.

* Total resources includes Measured, Indicated and Inferred categories from the February 22, 2012 43-101 update for the Monument Bay Resource Estimate (Op & UG). Due to the uncertainty that may be attached to Inferred Mineral Resources, it cannot be assumed that all or any part of an Inferred Mineral Resource will be upgraded to an Indicated or Measured Mineral Resource as a result of continued exploration.

 

Preliminary Surficial Geology of the Knee Lake-Oxford House Area
M. Trommelen (Manitoba Geological Survey)

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This presentation highlights this summer’s Quaternary fieldwork in the Knee Lake area (NTS 53L14,15; 53M1, 2). Geological observations, sampling of glacial sediments (till), and/or measurements of ice-flow indicators were recorded at 198 stations within a 3720 km2 area in central-northeastern Manitoba. These observations are compiled with data from 695 surficial geology field sites, collected during Manitoba Geological Survey’s multimedia and kimberlite-indicator mineral Operation Superior project, undertaken from 1999 to 2001 in the same area. As a result of this work, four new surficial geology maps (1:50 000 scale) will be released.  Additionally, fieldwork has shown that the ice flow history of the region is more complex than previously described, and consists of five phases. Ongoing analyses of field data and till composition (clast lithology and matrix geochemistry) will determine the relationship between the orientation of erosional ice-flow indicators (striae), streamlined landforms (drumlinoid ridges) and till composition (clast and geochemistry of the matrix). Understanding these relationships is key for successful drift prospecting in northern Manitoba, as these relationships will help determine the effect of major ice flow directions on erosion, deposition and transport distances.

 

The Petrogenesis and Rare Earth Element Potential of the Cinder Lake Alkaline Intrusive Complex, Knee Lake Greenstone Belt
R. Kressall (Dalhousie University)

Alkaline complexes, Neoarchean in age (2.77-2.63 Ga), are found intrusive into greenstone belts throughout the Superior Province. In nearly all cases, the alkaline complexes consist of silica-undersaturated rocks closely associated with silica-oversaturated rocks. At Cinder Lake, cancrinite-nepheline syenite and vishnevite syenite form on the outer rim of a monzogranite pluton. Geochemistry of the monzogranite and syenites suggests that both units intruded into a continental arc tectonic setting. The age of the syenites and monzogranite is coeval with the 2.72-2.71 Ga collision between the North Caribou and North Superior superterranes during the amalgamation of the Superior craton. Potassic metasomatism of the monzogranite near the contact supports the syenites being the younger intrusion. High rare earth element (REE) concentrations have previously been documented at Cinder Lake (up to 0.9 wt. %: Assessment File 72612). In the current study, the highest REE-concentrations are observed in metasomatized syenite samples followed by pegmatite samples bearing carbonatitic veinlets. The presence of calcite veinlets suggests the possibility of a larger unexposed carbonatite at Cinder Lake that would be the likely source of REE-mineralization and metasomatism at Cinder Lake.

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iMaQs and Map Gallery Demonstration

How to Get the Most Out of the New Map Gallery
P. Lenton and G. Keller (Manitoba Geological Survey)

Map Gallery is the new Internet tool used by Mineral Resources Division to provide public access to current regulatory and geoscientific information for Manitoba. The information provided includes regulatory maps and databases from the Manitoba Mines Branch and the Manitoba Petroleum Branch and geoscience maps and data from the Manitoba Geological Survey. While very powerful in its capabilities and in the richness of the data content, the Map Gallery is easy to access and use. There is no need to install software or have any specialized hardware. Map Gallery runs in most web browsers and is usable with any computer capable of accessing the internet. This presentation will provide an overview of the features, tools and data selection available in the new Map Gallery followed by a live presentation during which audience participation and questions will be welcomed.

 

Mining the Information Out of iMaQs
V. Luellman (Manitoba Innovation, Energy and Mines)

iMaQs (Integrated Mining and Quarrying System) offers an entirely new way for clients to do business with the Mines Branch in Manitoba.  iMaQs clients can submit applications and pay associated fees at their convenience from home, office or anywhere with an internet connection.  Clients can access their information and manage their dispositions 24 hours a day. The presentation will provide an overview to create an online iMaQs account and disposition management processes.

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Keynote Speaker

Doing Business with First Nations–Challenges and Opportunities
S. Paul (Thompson Dorfman Sweatman LLP)

Since at least 2003, the duty of consultation and accommodation has been the dominant topic in Aboriginal law.  At its core, the duty of consultation is meant to prompt dialogue. In this dialogue, each party starts from their own unique perspective.  The purpose of my speech is to talk about these starting points from a personal perspective-- to talk about some stories about interactions between the Dene people and the larger Canadian society that have been shared with me and how these stories (though set decades in the past) have contemporary relevance to consultations that occur today.

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